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Title: La série des U

URL: http://collection.eliterature.org/1/works/bootz_fremiot__the_set_of_u/index.htm

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Organization: Electronic Literature Organization

Description: A poem with pictures and audio components whose words, composed and presented by Phillipe Bootz, are reworked by the computer freshly each time the piece is launched. The textual elements appear as animated letters on the surface of a shockwave based picture, whose surface (like the superimposed letters) is also changing. This textual and visual flow is accompanied by sound that seems to go in synch with the entire composition but which is, in fact, also part of the programming. Bootz addresses the work both to a reader for the multimedia components and to a "meta-reader" whose reading accomplishment can be widened by exploring the code. Bootz holds that "reading is a limited activity that is unable to give a complete knowing of the work." A translation from the French is given on a separate page, its content responds to what is seen and experienced by the reader. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 20 times between Feb 02, 2008 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   music ,  multilingual or Non-English shockwave combinatorial generative audio Animation/Kinetic Collaboration

Title: FILMTEXT 2.0

URL: http://www.markamerika.com/filmtext/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Organization: Electronic Literature Organization

Description: With FILMTEXT 2.0 (2001-2002), Mark Amerika presents a remix of philosophical inquiry on time and being, data perception and manipulation, networking culture, and writing, the final complement of his trilogy (GRAMMATRON, 1997 and PHON:E:ME, 1999). As a tourist in a visually changing landscape, the reader explores an interface that simulates a game-like environment. The user's task is to trigger cones of light that shimmer on the screen. Once activated, narrative paths unfold through animated texts, spoken-words, or videos. A central narrative construction in this work is the creation of a "Digital Thoughtographer" (DT), Amerika's personified concept character. The DT is a lens that looks like an image-capture device through which the viewer can access coded text fragments that appear as programmed scripts, images, and flickering video excerpts. Amerika uses the DT as an instrument that takes the perspective of an omniscent narrator who communicates defragmented statements to the reader/viewer: "There is only perception: the experience of seeing what is there in front of our eyes and capturing that thereness in the experiential act of perception." Mark Amerika's composition of texts is built on Raymond Federman's concepts of surfiction, critifiction, and playgiarism. The texts are digital remixes of theoretical views once expressed and assigned to known philosophers which the DT transmits without referencing sources directly. For example, the following statement resembles Barthes' questions about authorship: "Who are the ghosts in the literary machine?" Elsewhere he evokes Baudrillard, observing "Not only can there be no original, the simulacrum has now lost its punch too", "Aura is interface", "There is only perception." In the work at hand, the reader/viewer's perception blurs with facts and fiction in which Amerika's poetics of hacktivism and remixology are set into scene. Mark Amerika's trilogy ends with the continuation of what he envisoned with GRAMMATRON in 1997: "To approach the computer-mediated network environment of the World Wide Web as an experimental writing zone, one where the evolving language of new media would reflect the convergence of image-writing, sound-writing, language writing, and code writing as complementary processes . . ." (181, META/DATA). Subtitled "MetaTourism: Interior Landscapes, Digital Thoughtography", FILMTEXT 2.0 is a collaborative achievement of many artists and comes along with an ambient background soundtrack. Excerpts from the "Digital Thoughtographer" are available on the author's website at http://www.altx.com/ebooks/download.cfm/c1.pdf Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 8 times between Nov 22, 2010 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   Flash video animation collaborative audio,  music ,  philosophical remix surfiction

Title: The Lair of the Marrow Monkey

URL: http://www.marrowmonkey.com/lair/index.htm/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Organization: Electronic Literature Organization

Description: Upon launching Erik Loyer's The Lair of the Marrow Monkey (1998), a web-based work of digital fiction powered by Shockwave software animation, readers not only see the opening navigation screen, but must feel their way around it. Nine circles orbit, carrousel-like, around a tower constructed with two triangles, one inverted and resting on top of the other. The sound of an eerie synthesized pulsing accompanies each rotation, which speeds up the farther away the reader moves the mouse. A tiny number appears at the foot of each, counting - up or down depending on which way the shapes orbit - from one to nine. (...) Read the entire elit work article Dave Ciccoricco at http://directory.eliterature.org/node/618

Captured 8 times between Nov 22, 2010 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   poetry audio,  music ,  narrative cognition consciousness digital fiction interactive motion graphics interior monologue jazz letters memory mind poem posthuman spoken word

Title: Faith

URL: http://www.wordcircuits.com/faith/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Organization: Electronic Literature Organization

Description: In this work of kinetic concrete poetry the interface serves as a stage for words directed by poet Robert Kendall. Each of the expressions used perform Kendall's interpretation of the words meaning "Faith" and resemble a specific character that differs in color, typescript, movement, and sound. The "expanding multi-verse" is a poem in five 'movements' that consists of four differently colored layers of text that are revealed one after the other by mouse clicks. Each of the sucessive layers of text is overlaid on the previous one(s), incorporating the 'old' text into the new. The new words glide into the text from various directions replacing the 'old'. Semantically, each new state engages in an argument with the previous one(s). On the level of content, the poem thematizes the relationship of "logic", "theory", and "doubt". To each of these expressions, a certain color (red, orange, brown, black) and behavior is assigned. Additionally, the five 'movements' are accompanied by music: xylophone-like sounds, melodies of a harp, spheric synthesizer vibrations which merge with the harp in the fourth movement, and in the final instance, the xylophone tones prevail. The orchestrated words performed on the screen reinforce the poem's meaning visually, auditorily, and semantically. Special to this work of concrete poetry is the dynamic use of space that make the words move: some of the words glide out of the text space, other words bend down to the right or, like the word "leap", jump into the foreground. In the end, all words fall to the ground except one: "faith". Parts of this description are cited from "The Virtual Muse. Forms and Theory of Digital Poetry" by Norbert Bachleitner published in: Theory into Poetry: New Approaches to the Lyric by Eva Mueller-Zettelmann and Margarete Rubik. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 8 times between Nov 22, 2010 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   Flash Animation/Kinetic poetry audio,  music ,  concrete poetry

Title: NIPP0N

URL: http://www.yhchang.com/NIPPON.html/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Organization: Electronic Literature Organization

Description: NIPP0N portrays a situation in a night-club and narrates the thoughts, actions, and interactions of a group of businessmen and "working women". In this work, the narrative alternates between first and third-person points-of-view, shifting between the perspectives of the women, the men, and an omniscient narrator. A horizontal screen-division displays the text bilingually: Japanese ideograms in red against a white backdrop on the top and English presented with white letters against red beneath. The unnamed characters are depicted as archetypes: the domineering madam, the leggy, lust-inspiring singer, the man who flirts with the prostitute while praising his loyal wife and making excuses for being out rather than at home. These stories are so common that the female listeners have "HEARD THIS— KIND — ØF — STØRY— MANY — TIMES". Marc Voge and Young-hae Chang, two Seoul-based artists known as Young-Hae Chang Heavy Industries (YHCHI) usually present their works as flash-narratives that come along with a synergistic interplay of text, music, color, and animation. Music is an integral component of YHCHI's pieces as the Flash animation tends to be synced to the melodies and rhythms of the music they choose. For the work at hand, the duo used a Thelonius Monk recording titled "Japanese Folk Song" from the "Straight, No Chaser" (1967) album. Generally, NIPP0N's narrative identifies the work as revolving around the presentation and deconstruction of binaries: Displayed onscreen are the dichotomies of English/Japanese, red/white, East/West, work/leisure, male/female, or commerce/sex. Its effect is an audio-visual encounter between the languages and cultures. While the work's title is the only indication of a geographical location given, the narrative could happen in any urban setting. It is, in a sense, universal. And so might the cultural critique entailed in this work be applied universally: At the end of the night and of NIPP0N's animation, the parasitic sickness is shown to be a symptom of a larger cultural, and decidedly corporate, epidemic: "THIS— IS — AN — INDUSTRY— LØVING/ YØUR MØM". The work ends by showing that the effects of global corporate capitalism are not limited to the confines of the after-hours bar but are evident in the daytime when the streets are filled with "TØØ MANY MEN IN DARK-GREY SUITS/ HURRY TØ TAXIS,/ AND LØØK HØW MANY— HAVE —CHAUFFERS". NIPP0N exposes a situation in which "TØØ MANY MEN", too uniformly dressed, and possessing too much money spill out of bars and brothels and into a morning light. The presented narrative written by the artists is a single Flash file. It runs for 16 minutes and contains no options for reader-controlled navigation, no buttons to pause, slow, or stop the animation of text that flashes in high-speed in front of the readers eyes. Parts of this description are cited from "Reading the Code between the Words: The Role of Translation in Young-hae Chang Heavy Industries's Nippon" by Jessica Pressman http://www.brown.edu/Research/dichtung-digital/2007/Pressman/Pressman.htm Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 8 times between Nov 22, 2010 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   Flash,  music ,  sound animated text scalable dimensions

Page 1 of 1 (5 Total Results)