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Electronic Literature Organization

Archive-It Partner Since: Jul, 2007

Organization Type: NGOs

Organization URL: http://eliterature.org/   

Description:

The Electronic Literature Organization (ELO) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization established in 1999 to promote and facilitate the writing, publishing, and reading of electronic literature. Since its formation, the Electronic Literature Organization has worked to assist writers and publishers in bringing their literary works to a wider, global readership and to provide them with the infrastructure necessary to reach one another. Since 2006 the ELO has been housed at the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH) at the University of Maryland.

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Title: Enigma n

URL: http://www.vispo.com/animisms/enigman/meaning.html

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: Beginning with the provocative epigram by Phyllis Web, “The world is round. It moves in circles,” which gives way to a minimal interface with the word “meaning” placed in the center of a black screen, Jim Andrews’ “Enigma n” is a densely packaged experiment in the potency of language. With a click of the mouse, the reader can “Prod,” “Stir,” and “Tame” the word, causing the letters to swirl chaotically around no particular center. After all the options have been selected, the reader is permitted to restore order to the word by clicking “Spell.” Conceptually, the temporal sequence (epigram, the assertion of “meaning,” the reader’s acts of disruption, culminating in a restoration of order) might be interpreted as a parable of communication, from sender to receiver. As an experience of reading, the attentive mind will seize upon the various anagrams that arrange themselves chaotically, making sense wherever it is suggested by juxtaposition. However, Andrews’ piece does not simply end with the anti-climactic, almost jarring, return to order. The intrepid reader will quickly move to prod, stir, and tame the text again, and will be rewarded with a fifth option, “0/1,” which freezes the swirling letters in space. Another click on “0/1” opens up another option “Colour,” which invites further exploration leading to a reward at the end. In its entirety, “Enigma n” is an extraordinary and deceptively simple work that offers rich rewards for those who take the time to play with it. Entry drafted by: Davin Heckman

Captured  on Mar 05, 2010

Subject:   poetry animation html/dhtml visual poetry

Title: Revelations of Secret Surveillance

URL: http://www.well.com/user/jmalloy/gunterandgwen/titlepage.html

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: Revelations of Secret Surveillance weaves family history, fictional narrative and documentary material together in the story of German video artist Gunter and American writer Gwen. Spurred on by the discovery of a poem Gunter’s grandmother wrote in Nürnberg in 1933, they begin to explore past and present covert systems of surveillance and social control. Most of the characters in the narrative are recognizable from Malloy’s other work as is the minimalist visual layout of the epic composition, which is divided into preludes, interludes and cantos. The piece is composed as a hypertext in which the individual lexias work as independent entities. They can either be read sequentially by following the progression of the narrative (pressing the blue bar below the text), or the reading can branch out through the links (placed to the left of the interface). In this way an opaque, poetic universe is created, which questions causal relations as well as the probability of chance occurrences. The composition of the piece thus forms its own layer of reflection on the theme of covert surveillance and control. Entry drafted by: Kristin Veel

Captured  on Mar 05, 2010

Subject:   hypertext control epic surveillance

Title: 1969/99

URL: http://barrysmylie.com/flash/1999/index.htm

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: Barry Smylie’s “1969/99” features multiple hyperlinked web pages and flash animation. When viewed in Internet Explorer, the user can reveal superimposed text by mousing over images. It is dominated by graphics and sound from popular culture of the 1960s and 1990s. In particular, “1969/99” draws heavily on the themes and images of Fail Safe (1962) by Eugene Burdick and Harvey Wheeler, in which machine malfunctions and humanity’s blind faith in the infallibility of technology accidentally cause a nuclear war. Burdick and Wheeler’s book was adapted for film in 1964 and for television in 2000. Created during the Y2K frenzy, “1969/99” offers a complex (and sometimes comic) cultural commentary and comparison between Cold War America and that of the Millennium. For example, one page titled "the b52s" juxtaposes images of a B-52 strategic bomber with those of the New Wave band The B-52s. The B-52s song "Meet the Flintstones" is the featured audio track on another page, "evolution," where the cartoon images of the Flintstones (1960-66) are superimposed on the cast photo of The Flintstones Movie (1994). In “beatitude,” Smylie quotes from Allan Ginsberg’s “Howl,” “I saw the best minds of my generation,” while the soundtrack repeats “starving, hysterical, naked,” thus leaving the user to fill in the omitted portion of the line “destroyed by madness.” Entry drafted by: Crystal Alberts

Captured  on Mar 05, 2010

Subject:   Flash html/dhtml audio

Title: Seattle Drift

URL: http://www.vispo.com/animisms/SeattleDrift.html

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: Jim Andrews’ “Seattle Drift” is a play on motion and stasis, surface and depth. Its initially simple presentation consists of a self-described “bad text,” a subversive poem that moves and stutters around the screen when given the instruction to do so. A series of simple controls written in Dynamic HTML allows a user to guide its movement: one is given the option to “do” the text (which makes it drift around the screen), “stop” it (which freezes the letters mid-drift), or “discipline” it (which returns the letters to their original position). Stopping and starting the text allows the user to create new linguistic and visual configurations for the poem, and this flexibility is the cause of the text’s status as “bad”—it “used to be a poem, but drifted from the scene.” The poem dares its user with a come-on—“I just want you to do me”—that complicates the supposed transparency and stasis of the traditional written word, and makes the user an accomplice in this transformation. The poem itself has the experimental, minimalist quality that characterizes much of mid-90s net art, exploring the role of particular code functions in the construction of Web aesthetics while also playing with the code’s distance from (and closeness to) the surface of the Web browser. An Easter egg awaits those curious enough to explore the source code. Entry drafted by: Rob Schoenbeck

Captured  on Mar 05, 2010

Subject:   poetry animation html/dhtml

Title: Gabriella Infinita

URL: http://www.javeriana.edu.co/gabriella_infinita/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: Gabriella Infinita, a metamorphical work, is a lesson in the evolution of the internet. Three versions of the text are available: Novel, Hypertext and Hypermedia. In the tale, Gabriella arrives at the apartment of her lover, Frederico, the author, only to find him disappeared. In his stead, she has only his things, his writings, his clippings, his recordings. At the same time, in a parallel narrative, a group of people try to escape a building. They are trapped, moreso than they think, for they are characters in one of his stories. Since Rodríguez Ruiz made all of these versions available on the web (with commentaries), they serve as an excellent study in the forms themselves. In no way a lesson in progress, the adaptations and translations of his own tale reveal the strengths and limitations of these forms. Entry drafted by: Mark C. Marino

Captured 15 times between Apr 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Videos: 72 Videos Captured

Title: Arteroids

URL: http://vispo.com/arteroids/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: Arteroids is a literary shoot-em-up poem-game for the Web. The battle of poetry against itself and the forces of dullness. Pilot your red id-entity text against poetry and the forces of dullness. Winner takes wall. Write your own texts in Word for Weirdos. Save poetry from yourself. Game mode or play mode. Play for life and death in game mode. Shoot for art in play mode. Go on. I dare you. Entry drafted by: Scott Rettberg

Captured 15 times between Apr 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Videos: 6 Videos Captured

Subject:   cybertext poetry shockwave animation interactive software digital poetics digital art audio hypermedia kinetic game

Title: open.ended

URL: http://mrl.nyu.edu/~dhowe/open/open.html

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: Readers of print conventionally ignore the page surface so as to concentrate on interpreting what is printed there; in "open.ended," by contrast, surfaces are integral. Readers interact with lines of poetry that appearon two translucent shapes - one nested within the other. Because words on the inner shape are visible through the outer one, the printed lines can be read together or separately. The number of possible surface/text combinations is limited, but by merging shapes a surprising range of new stanzas can result. The reader can also control her angle of view so that more than one surface is visible, though all the words may not be legible. As the surfaces obscure the words, the materiality of the digital shapes overcomes linguistic signification. This phenomenon of surface overcoming text also occurs when the shapes overlap and obscure portions of the text. "open.ended" amounts to a poem without beginning or end since one does not move through the text in any predetermined order, yet the poetic object has boundaries delimited by the eight rotating surfaces. The reader's interaction with the shifting text is augmented--and usefully constrained--by an audio track of the author reading so that we, reading to ourselves, are reminded of lines from the poem we have already encountered, or we are given a preview of text to come. Despite the literal instability of the moving text, the audio track is the same each time, which lends consistency to repeated readings. Entry drafted by: Ben Underwood

Captured 15 times between Apr 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   poetry flash audio interactive 3D spatialization

Title: [theHouse]

URL: http://maryflanagan.com/house/index.html

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: Mary Flanagan's "[theHouse]" is a digital poem-environment that consists of strings of transparent, three-dimensional, occasionally intersecting, shifting boxes that are accompanied by paired lines, which in turn are re-combined as the piece progresses; we may watch them as they move across the screen, grow larger or smaller or rotate so that we read them in reverse—as if we could walk to the back of our language. Or, should we want to determine the shape and direction of the text/boxes, we can try to interact with the text/boxes through the mouse. Since Flanagan writes that "[a]s in much of electronic literature, the experience of the work as an intimate, interactive, screen-based piece is essential to understanding and appreciating it," the experience of interacting with this text-environment is primarily one of struggle or difficulty since there is no way to gain control over the text--no way to determine the direction in which the piece shifts. Pulling right on the mouse does not guarantee that the text will also shift right or rotate clockwise; moving the mouse up does not necessarily allow us to venture deep inside the boxes or the text—we may have just flipped the boxes/text or moved to a bird's eye view of this strange computer-text-organism. Thus, despite my interactions with the text, despite the fact that I can "read" most of the lines, in its difficulty "[theHouse]" is at least in part about the mediating effects of an interface that, despite Flanagan's claim above, offers intimacy while also declining it. Entry drafted by: Lori Emerson

Captured 12 times between Apr 27, 2009 and Nov 22, 2010

Subject:   Animation/Kinetic individual work 3D interactive poetry interactive art

Title: First Screening

URL: http://www.vispo.com/bp/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: Canadian poet bpNichol used an Apple IIe computer and the Apple BASIC programming language to create First Screening, one of the earliest collections of kinetic computer poems, in 1983-1984. The twelve poems in First Screening soundlessly move across a black computer screen and so the work both positions itself halfway between film and sound/concrete poetry and also as a self-conscious (mis-)use of the filmic medium for poetry. In First Screening it also appears as though Nichol - writing at the very beginning of the era of the PC - understands the ease with which the digital computer can efface the body. For example, midway through the screening, the reader/viewer is introduced to “ANY OF YOUR LIP: a silent sound poem for Sean O’Huigin” - the title alone gestures to the absent presence of the body. Once the poem begins, we see/read the simple alternation between “MOUTH” and “mouth,” “myth” and “MOUTH,” “math” and “MOUTH,” “mate” and “MOUTH,” “maze” and “MOUTH,” “amaze” and “MOUTH”, and then the alternation between “ing”, “amaze,” and “MOUTH” which closes with the repeated flashing of “ing” and, finally, “MOUTH.” While the poem is perhaps silent because of the technological limitations of Nichol’s time, looking back on “ANY OF YOUR LIP” it is noticeable how this paradoxical silent sound poem draws attention to its silence at the same time as it enacts and perhaps even encourages readerly interactivity. Especially with the repeated flashing of “ing” at the end of the poem, a verb-ending that signals generalized or uncompleted action, “ANY OF YOUR LIP” invites readers to sound out or to “mouth” the words at the same time as they also try to make sense of the connections between the words as they flash across the screen. While poems in First Screening are not interactive in the sense that we’ve been accustomed to finding on the Internet, they show us another iteration of an expanded sense of interactivity that does not depend on the hypertext link. Entry drafted by: Lori Emerson

Captured 15 times between Apr 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Videos: 12 Videos Captured

Subject:   Animation/Kinetic kinetic text

Title: Inanimate Alice

URL: http://www.inanimatealice.com/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: A multimedia online novel in three episodes set in China, Italy, and Russia, featuring a girl growing up in the 21st century. The episodes are part comic book, part animation, and part film, in a style intended to suggest Alice's developing career as an animator. Reader participation and interactivity increase as the series progresses, reflecting Alice's engagement and influence in her environment as she grows older. Episodes become more complex and the reader is asked to unravel riddles which become progressively more intricate. This way, Inanimate Alice has a game-like character but it also resembles theater, the coming-of-age novel, and the graphic novel. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 15 times between Apr 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   flash fiction interactive Animation/Kinetic collaboration electronic music video graphic novel

Title: The Purpling

URL: http://research-intermedia.art.uiowa.edu/tirw/vol9n2/artworks/The_Purpling/index.html

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: Prose poem published in The Iowa Review Web (TIR-W), Volume 9, Number 2: "Instruments and Playable Texts" (2008). “The Purpling” is comprised of approximately ten basic web pages of eight to ten lines each. By clicking on hyperlinks connected to segments of varying lengths, the reader enters what guest editor Stuart Moulthrop calls a "maze of recirculating expression.” While the words on the screen remain static, the reader's experience of "meaning" varies depending on the order of visited links. These visited links, in most browsers, also appear in purple, which becomes a visual representation of not only the work's title, but also the mingling of the reader with the text. Consequently, in both form and content, the work calls attention to nature of reading and questions the authority of a text. Entry drafted by: Crystal Alberts

Captured 15 times between Apr 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   hypertext poetry procedural constraint-based

Title: overboard

URL: http://homepage.mac.com/shadoof/net/in/overboardEng.html

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: overboard is an algorithmically animated work that combines borrowed text with graphic elements and sounds. The text is an adaptation of William Bradford’s account from Of Plymouth Plantation1620-1647 of an incident during the Mayflower crossing. It is a story of a man who falls overboard during a storm but catches hold of a rope and re-surfaces. The author’s adapted text is put through a process of algorithmically steered, time-based changes in which letters appear, disappear, and re-appear. These textual changes show how minute letter substitutions destabilize meaning, while simultaneously evoking other temporary and fluctuating meanings. The sounds are generated in a similar way as the words and help to create an ambient atmosphere. In overboard, the text visually reenacts the story while undermining the words’ lexical relationship until the original letters are restored and the story surfaces again. The ever-changing, ambient text functions as a visual rendering of its own linguistic message: its illegibility is readable as a symbol for the sinking man. The author explains his interest in algorithmically generated processes of textual changes as an intention “to interrogate certain relationships between the granular or atomic structures of alphabetically transcribed language and the critically or interpretatively discoverable rhetorical and aesthetic effects of literature.” (http://www.dichtung-digital.org/2004/2-Cayley.htm) (Parts of this text were modified from "Reading Digital Arts. In-Depth-Analysis and Historic Contextualization" by Roberto Simanowski.) Entry drafted by: Maria Engberg

Captured 14 times between Jul 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Videos: 5 Videos Captured

Subject:   kinetic text appropriated texts quicktime audio ambient time-based constraint-based translation algorithm

Title: Marginalia in the Libary of Babel

URL: http://www.cddc.vt.edu/journals/newriver/07Fall/marino/index.html

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: A metafiction written in annotated web pages, this tale follows one narrator's browsing history and reflections on the content he encounters. The tale begins with a meditation on Borges' short story "The Library of Babel" but soon moves into despair at our inability to leave, as Marino puts it: "a meaningful mark on the Internet." But this work makes the Web notable by making use of Web 2.0 features: Social Bookmarking, that allows Internet users to store, share and retrieve visited Webpages. The work uses pages from the Internet for its palette and invites readers to add their own annotations and bookmarks. Adding their own layer of meta-narrative, readers create collaborative Web-Travelogues by leaving a bookmark as a footnote. Marginalia has an enormous history that long predates contemporary footnoting practice. Thus, Marino's work is digitally following the genre of annotation fiction. He asserts: "why not turn the web into a means of characterization, to turn web reading practices themselves into ways of examining the ergodic, interiority of our characters, or to stitch together tales of paranoia in the way that various Alternate Reality Games have." Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 14 times between Jul 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Videos: 23 Videos Captured

Subject:   web-annotation metafiction java

Title: M.D. Coverley Web Fictions

URL: http://califia.us/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: A number of multilinear Web Fictions, Poetry and Hypermedia works: Narratives with text, image, and sound. The collection includes Coverley's "Fingerprints on Digital Glass"- eight short web stories of altered perception as well as "The Magic Millennium CyberCarpet", a story that goes backward and forward in time. The Webpage links also to works created in collaboration with other artists and to Coverley's Academic Pages that include interviews, articles, and Web-Non Fiction having to do with electronic literature. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 14 times between Jul 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Videos: 14 Videos Captured

Subject:   poetry fiction hypermedia sound

Title: Frequently Asked Questions about "Hypertext"

URL: http://www.stanford.edu/~holeton/hypertext/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: Like Nabokov in Pale Fire, Holeton presents a metafictional parodic exegesis on the academic discourse of early hypertext criticism. Designed in the form of a hypertextual FAQ webpage document, Holeton's short fiction emanates from a poem composed of anagrams of the word "hypertext". Clicking on links produces tongue-in-cheek interpretations of the fictional poem along with perspectives on Language Poetry, cultural studies, feminism, and transgender studies. Nine answers to frequently asked questions offer up "the story with the fan fiction and the double murder." Entry drafted by: Patrricia Tomaszek

Captured 14 times between Jul 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Videos: 69 Videos Captured

Subject:   hypertext network forms fiction html/dhtml parody/satire

Title: Shadows Never Sleep

URL: http://www.technekai.com/shadow/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: Shadows Never Sleep is the final story in a series of narratives written by Aya Karpinska, each exploring different aspects of reading using digital media. As with the prior works in the series, Shadows Never Sleep is evocative of children's stories and folk tales. The work is designed to make use of the iPhone as a storytelling platform. Rather than turning pages or selecting paths through the narrative, readers "zoom" into the story revealing new images and text. Shadows Never Sleep is divided into three "pages," each containing more panels than the prior, 1, 8, and 64 respectively. The simple black and white images are interposed with minimal text, evoking the play of light and dark, and the anthropomorphization of shadows that constitute the subject of this work. Entry drafted by: Dave Parry

Captured 13 times between Oct 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Videos: 12 Videos Captured

Subject:   interactive children`s stories zoom-narrative iphone picture-story classic folk tale

Title: l0ve0ne

URL: http://www.eastgate.com/malloy/welcome.html

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: l0ve0ne is a hypertext of 129 lexias and was the first selection in the Eastgate Web Workshop. The text is the diary of a hacker and WebMOO aficionado, Gweneth, and recounts her relationship with a German hacker named Gunter. The text explores the possibilities of emotional, sexual, and even human relationships in a world augmented by and through mediated computer technologies. In reading Gweneth's experiences as she travels across the United States and Europe with and looking for Gunter--who might be posing as his own cousin, Stefan, and consequently remains an unstable and mysterious figure throughout the text--one is reminded of Thomas Pynchon's novel V. Even more like V. herself, however, is the character Aimee. She first appears (depending on the order in which you read the text) as a non-player character (NPC)in a game being designed by the German hacker collective Schinkenbrotchen. Surprisingly, Gweneth later meets Aimee in the flesh and learns that she might have stolen Gunter/Stefan away from Gweneth. The indeterminacy of these characters, the unending search for them, as well as the machine-augmented bodies and sexuality of the characters seems to descend from Pynchon's frequent concerns. One of the first hypertexts written for the World Wide Web, l0ve0ne consists of white text against a black, blue, green, or red background; the black background is most frequent. The links are not words within the text but are rather underscored gaps that appear within the passages. The text can be read with or without frames, and the choice determines with which lexia the text opens. l0ve0ne's last lexia, "reset," directs the reader to another Malloy hypertext, The Roar of Destiny Emanated from the Refrigerator. Entry drafted by: Brian Croxall

Captured 13 times between Oct 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   hypertext fiction html/dhtml cyberculture webfiction codework

Title: The Mandrake Vehicles

URL: http://www.conduit.org/online/buchanan/buchanan.html

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: This Flash-based creation encompasses a series of 3 prose poems that gradually dissolve (in animated sequences) to reveal poems "hidden" within them. Each of three initial block texts can be read sequentially; however, the essence of this piece is the way letters fly from those initial texts to reveal the hidden poems. Each of these three initial texts have two poems "embedded" in them. At first, the remaining letters remain in place, like the buildings that survived the earthquake. On subsequent pages, these characters close ranks to form the words of the embedded poems. Additionally, each surviving letter casts off versions of itself which fall down the surface of the poem, colliding with other cast-off versions and forming alternate unused words which stack up in a heap below the poem. Thematically, the pieces bring together the "famous occult associations of the European mandrake" with the American one (mayapple). The poems play with the rhizomatic nature of roots and rhizomes of literary allusions. Readers cannot uproot these mandrakes without being caught in the underground tangle of sex, death, and renewal. Entry drafted by: Mark C. Marino

Captured 13 times between Oct 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Title: Unknown Territories: Voyage Into The Unknown

URL: http://www.unknownterritories.org/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: "Voyage into the Unknown" by Roderick Coover is an historical non-fiction hypertext about the first geographic expedition down the Colorado River in 1869. The three-month journey was led by John Wesley Powell who, with his eight fellow boatmen, departed from Green River City in northern Utah towards the Gulf of California. Coover investigates in the question of how we come to know and imagine an "unknown territory" and provides the answer with the navigational technique he applies in his work: an interactive panoramic environment with a digitally re-worked map of the journey, in which the user navigates though the desert landscape using a seamless, horizontally scrolling interface. The reader, who takes the perspective of crew member George Bradley, faces an unknown literary space he can choose to explore in several different ways. He can either use red arrows to move back and forth within the landscape or use the "key" numbered from one to twenty that recalls a chapter-like navigation. In order to "read the unknown territory", the user is forced to explore the map that is marked with points of interest. These markers (abbreviations that are explained in an introductory agenda at the beginning of the piece) work like hyperlinks that, once activated, name places passed, people the group met or events they experienced. A diary-like narrative unfolds in short excerpts of texts that reveal what happend when the crew was declared dead and how they managed to survive in "the darkest hour" when subsistences decreased each day. The narrative is contested with researched facts that interwine with actual diary accounts and works by John Wesley Powell, along with additional publications by other crew members (George Bradley, John Sumner, and Frederick Dellenbaugh). Coover also integrates primary visual works by E.O. Beaman, John Hillers, and Thomas Moran with new and original writing, artwork, and interactive devices. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 4 times between Jul 27, 2009 and May 28, 2010

Subject:   hypertext Flash nonfiction historical

Title: So Random

URL: http://research-intermedia.art.uiowa.edu/tirw/vol9n2/artworks/soRandom/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: Shawn Rider's "So Random" consists of a short hypertext narrative of a bus ride told from several different points of view. Each time a reader accesses the work, an instantiation of it is assembled from chunks of text based on tags assigned to each section. For a piece of electronic literature, the work has a conservative visual presentation. Each version consists of three pages that resemble the appearance of text in a word processing program. The reader has the option of reading the pages consecutively or of clicking on words to generate an entirely new three-page version of the work. With relatively few options, the reader is at the mercy of the algorithm assembling the text, and without access to the logic of the text selection, the work feels "so random." Entry drafted by: Ben Underwood

Captured 14 times between Jul 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   hypertext fiction Anthologies algorithm

Title: Roulette

URL: http://www.cddc.vt.edu/journals/newriver/nrjguest/howe/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: "Roulette" is a language game for readers, a single work that can be read in roughly 64,000 ways. The lines of the poem shift every time you interact with one of the three lines of the poem. By clicking and holding a block for a few moments, the reader can activate a change in the text. Only one line of the poem changes at a time, so the two stable lines give a context for the altered one, a background against which alternative meanings are generated. Those other lines can then be altered in turn. The work appears clothed in an endless night sky that foregrounds rotating, colorful cubic containers, each one containing smaller rotating cubes. From there, from out of the cubes, the word emerges along with background music that calls to mind a night out at the casino. The poetic content concerns philosophical questions concerning life, relationships, and language, and at times seems to generate a meta-commentary on randomness and the work itself. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 14 times between Jul 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Title: Deep Surface

URL: http://www.smoulthrop.com/lit/ds/deepSurface.htm

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: On immersion in reading and its risks - where reading means, in this case, pointing and clicking on the work's interface and thereby diving, submerging, and even to risk drowning in the literary pool. The work opens with a simple proposition: "what if the pages of a book - or more accurately, the SO_CALLED PAGES OF THE WEB - were made from some pliable fluid, like water, so that we could dive gradually from one plane of presentation to the next?" The reader is presented with a structure for setting up dive points on the reading interface. At these points, the reader may hover, move to another point, or else move up or down to earn points for a successful reading approach. This kind of imersion through clicking, chosing, and wandering might be thought closer to a game than a literary text, although we have to know something about the developing text to know how to play, how "to breathe," and especially how to read inside this textual immersion. An original take on the peculiarity of electronic textuality, Deep Surface is perhaps best regarded as a textual instrument. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 14 times between Jul 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   Flash Animation/Kinetic textual instrument audio interactive Graphics synthetic voices

Title: Birds Singing Other Birds' Songs

URL: http://www.m.mencia.freeuk.com/birdsfla/skymove.swf

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: In Birds Singing Other Birds' Songs, a work shown as a video installation and now available as a Flash version on the Web, birds' sounds were transcribed into morphemes representing human perception of their songs. The corresponding graphemes are then animated to form the bodies of birds flying with human voices, tweaked by the computer, articulating the sounds denoted by the marks. In the complex processes of translation that the work instantiates, the human is in-mixed with nonhuman life forms to create hybrid entities that represent the conjunction of human and nonhuman ways of knowing. A reenactment of the history of literacy through different media as it moves from sounds present in the environment to written marks (orality/writing), written marks to the iconographic shapes of the animated avian bodies (writing/digital images), accompanied by the re-representation of human speech as computerized voice production (digital multimodality). Although Mencia's work can be classified as electronic literature, it is fundamentally about literacy rather than any literary form, illustrating the interrogations that the literary can undertake of the histories, contexts, and productions of literature. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek (Parts of this description are cited from "New Horizons for the Literary" by N. Katherine Hayles)

Captured 13 times between Oct 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   Flash Animation/Kinetic audio

Title: Disappearing Rain

URL: http://www.deenalarsen.net/rain/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: The only trace left of Anna, a freshman at the University of California, Berkeley, is an open internet connection in the computer in her neatly furnished dorm room. Deena Larsen invites readers to join four generations of a Japanese-American family as they search for Anna and discover credit card conspiracies, ancient family truths, waterfalls that pour out of televisions, and the terrifying power of the web. The detective story unwinds, one link at a time, but even as readers explore Anna's disappearance, Larsen also orchestrates our own disappearance in the virtual reality of the internet. Hypertext links lead the reader to relevant url's on the web for actual companies and institutions (e.g., the Sheraton Hotel, or commonly encountered web pages (e.g., "Object not found"). As these real world links increasingly turn to errors, our search for Anna seems as elusive as the desire to track the Internet's ephemera. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 13 times between Oct 27, 2009 and Aug 22, 2012

Title: Errand Upon Which We Came

URL: http://califia.us/Errand/title1a.htm

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: In Errand, animation is used to establish links and disjunctions between images of moving objects in the natural world (e.g. frogs and butterflies) and the lexical and figural dynamics of the poem. These visual-kinetic images heighten the tensions among the meaning-mobilizing acts of "seeing an image," "watching a movement," and "reading a word"; and insofar as these works also employ cursor-activated elements, between "touching" and "reading." Errand reflects on the nature of language and of reading, and these self-reflexive elements are embedded in considerations of how protocols of reading shape our consciousness. In calling attention to gaps between "movement" and "meaning," between "reading" and "acting," Errand grounds its kinetic poetics in concerns of ethics and cultural politics. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 22 times between Aug 06, 2007 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   shockwave women authors animation collaborative interactive visual poetry textual instrument kinetic text poetry

Title: V: Vniverse

URL: http://vniverse.com/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: A Shockwave work by Stephanie Strickland and Cynthia Lawson. This work was made as the third component of an intermedia poem whose two other parts were bound together, upside down to each other, in a volume written by Strickland and published by Penguin, V: WaveSon.nets/Losing L'una, 1992. At the center of the book are pointers to the url. The digital poem was published in the Iowa Review Web, 2002, with critical material by Jaishree Odin, and with an essay by the authors in New River, 2003.

Captured 21 times between Aug 06, 2007 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   visual poetry interactive collaborative textual instrument women authors shockwave poetry kinetic text

Title: slippingglimpse

URL: http://slippingglimpse.org/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: slippingglimpse is a 10-part generative Flash poem combining videos of ocean patterns with text. The work introduces three modes of reading: fullscreen, high resolution, and scroll-text mode. In the first two modes, fragments of words and phrases appear in the ocean, mapped and remapped to movement in the video image, turning from an unreadable text to a decipherable composition. In fullscreen mode, ocean videos "read" the poem text somatically or gesturally. In high-rez mode, the ocean-patterning itself is best visible, those patterns the videographer set out to capture and enhance. Only the scroll-text mode permits human reading of linear print text. The language of the poem comes in part from sampling and recombining the words of visual artists as they reflect on their own work (among them, Helaman Ferguson, Manfred Mohr, David Berg, Ellen Carey, Frances Dose, Marius Johnston, Jon Lybrook, Susan Rankaitis, Hildegard of Bingen). Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 20 times between Aug 06, 2007 and Aug 22, 2012

Videos: 60 Videos Captured

Subject:   flash collaborative kinetic text poetry women authors visual poetry video

Title: Jason Nelson: Net Art/Digital Poetics

URL: http://www.secrettechnology.com/works/everything.htm

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: A visual index, with a paragraph of description, of each of Jason Nelson's work. Scrolling from the bottom of the page to the top lets one view the artist's work chronologically from 2001 to the present, offering one potential trajectory for the field development as a whole, spanning hypertexts, short fictions, poems, haikus, games, all of which are computer generated and include image in combination with multimedia elements, code, text, and sound. Browsing the collection means witnessing the ways electronic literature involves readers and shows the potential for involving programming and multimedial devices and embedded text as in, for example the flash-based work titled, "this will be the end of you: play4: within within." Here, holding the mouse allows the user to move "into words" and to play with text as it emerges. Readers control the movement on the interface by holding or releasing the mouse and can thereby determine the mouse driven fly through of texts and images that float towards or away from the user. Or the work, "game, game, game and again game" which uses the a side scrolling gaming interface to navigate through a mix of poetics content and corresponding hand-drawn elements. This play, either literal or through interface serves as a metaphor of what Nelson wishes to transfer with the artwork: some scattered [imaginations, some] oddly organized fire of thoughts and incomplete ideas" or simply a comment on the internet and its nonlinearity and the new possibilities of digital poetics. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 23 times between Aug 06, 2007 and Nov 22, 2012

Subject:   hypertext flash generative audio animation textual instrument net art digital poetics poetry network forms combinatorial interactive visual poetry fiction appropriated texts

Title: The Unknown

URL: http://unknownhypertext.com/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: The Unknown is a collaborative hypertext novel written on the World Wide Web during the turn of the millennium. It is a text about a book tour that takes on the excesses of a rock tour. The work is notorious for breaking the "comedy barrier" in electronic literature, replacing the pretentious modernism and self-consciousness of previous hypertext works with a pretentious postmodernism and self-absorption that is more satirical in nature. The Unknown includes several sections or "lines" of content including a sickeningly decadent hypertext novel, metafictional bullshit, documentary material, correspondence, art projects, documentation of live readings, a press kit, and more. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 28 times between Aug 06, 2007 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   hypertext network novel encyclopedic metafiction comedy collaborative postmodern fiction parody/satire html/dhtml network forms

Title: The Ballad of Sand and Harry Soot

URL: http://www.wordcircuits.com/gallery/sandsoot

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: The “Ballad of Sand and Harry Soot” is a poem written by Stephanie Strickland as a score for a hypertext implementation, coded by Janet Holmes. Its images are suggestive of digital or mathematical culture, including Webcam photos, a core dump, an animated fractal, and algorithmic patterns inscribed in sand by a computer-driven steel ball. The latter images are from Jean-Pierre Hébert’s and Bruce Shapiro’s work, "Sisyphus" (1999). These images accompany the text of a love poem, a ballad of love gone wrong, or at least not entirely right, between Sand and Soot. At one level, the disjunction of image and text mirrors the difficulties of this pair. However, this discordance will spring into resonant oscillation for readers who either see or read an avatar of carbon-based chemistry in Harry Soot and silicon life in Sand. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 20 times between Aug 06, 2007 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   hypertext visual poetry interactive html women authors poetry

Title: These Waves of Girls

URL: http://www.yorku.ca/caitlin/waves/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: These Waves of Girls is a hypermedia novella exploring memory, girlhoods, cruelty, childhood play, and lesbian sexuality. The piece is composed as a series of small stories, artifacts, interconnections, and meditations from the point of view of a girl (or girls) at various ages from four to twenty. Fisher's work is distinct for its hypermedia features: each text passage is illustrated by new images and therefore presents a new interface for each chunk of text, some passages are read by the author. On the level of content, the story's characters try to find and come to terms with their sexuality. Figuratively, this construction of self is mirrored in the hypertextual structure Fisher makes use of: The reader witnesses the characters' identity construction by following one link after the other, coming closer to what identity means to the stories' characters': "We've all been fifteen. I look very much the same, only at fifteen I'm a little larger, a little stronger. I'll believe anything. I tell people I believe nothing." Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 21 times between Nov 04, 2007 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   hypertext flash women authors audio fiction dhtml html sexuality memoir

Title: Sunshine 69

URL: http://www.sunshine69.com/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: In the Web's first hypertext novel Bobby Rabyd [Robert Arellano] explores the pop-cultural shadow-side of 1969 -- from the moon landing to the Manson murders, from a Vietnam veteran's PTSD to a rock star's idolatry, from the love-in at Woodstock to the murder at Altamont -- by relating intermixed stories and emphazising graphics and music. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 20 times between Nov 04, 2007 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   hypertext graphic audio fiction html historical novel

Title: La série des U

URL: http://collection.eliterature.org/1/works/bootz_fremiot__the_set_of_u/index.htm

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: A poem with pictures and audio components whose words, composed and presented by Phillipe Bootz, are reworked by the computer freshly each time the piece is launched. The textual elements appear as animated letters on the surface of a shockwave based picture, whose surface (like the superimposed letters) is also changing. This textual and visual flow is accompanied by sound that seems to go in synch with the entire composition but which is, in fact, also part of the programming. Bootz addresses the work both to a reader for the multimedia components and to a "meta-reader" whose reading accomplishment can be widened by exploring the code. Bootz holds that "reading is a limited activity that is unable to give a complete knowing of the work." A translation from the French is given on a separate page, its content responds to what is seen and experienced by the reader. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 20 times between Feb 02, 2008 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   music multilingual or Non-English shockwave combinatorial generative audio Animation/Kinetic Collaboration

Title: Blue Company

URL: http://www.robwit.net/bluecompany2002/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: Blue Company is a novel composed of email messages from Berto, a lovesick copywriter transferred to 14th Century Italy who addressed letters to his romantic correspondent in the 21st Century. People were able to subscribe to Blue Company and received email messages from Berto for a month. The novel was performed twice: once in Spring 2001 and again in Spring 2002. The 2002 performance was followed by Scott Rettberg's unauthorized continuation of the fiction. He e-mailed to many of the same Blue Company subscribers and composed "Kind of Blue." It is a sequel that re-casts the characters of Blue Company. The last letter of "Kind of Blue" was written by Rettberg and Wittig collaboratively, thus knitting the two pieces together finalizing a collaborative style of "chatmail." Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 20 times between Feb 02, 2008 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   network forms collaboration visual poetry or narrative email narrative

Title: The Dreamlife of Letters

URL: http://collection.eliterature.org/1/works/stefans__the_dreamlife_of_letters.html

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: A poet's playful meditation on the nature and function of letterforms in kinetic two-dimensional space. Dreamlife is a Flash animation, based on a text by the feminist literary theorist Rachel Blau DuPlessis, which explores the ground between classic concrete poetry, avant-garde, feminist practice, and "ambient" poetics. Stefans responded DuPlessis by using words of her text: "all I did was alphabetize the words in it and then construct shorter poems from them." The short film runs about 11 minutes and shows letters that perform their "dreams" on the screen. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 20 times between Feb 02, 2008 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   flash Animation/Kinetic visual poetry appropriated texts ambient non-interactive

Title: The Jew's Daughter

URL: http://www.artic.edu/~jmorrissey/tjsd/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: "The Jew's Daughter" is an interactive, non-linear, multivalent narrative. A hypertext, but one that transforms the text (rather than just linking from one stable text to another). As soon as the reader moves the mouse over highlighted keywords (links), segments of a page replace one another fluidly. While always remaining syntactically and semantically intact, passages are replaced by a new text within a static rectangular text-space. The work's content corresponds to the unstable form: Characters, for example, are not fixed identities; they can be, by turns, contemporary and historical. The algorithmic text generation calls on readers to explore a text that changes with the addition or deletion of passages at random throughout the narrative. By placing authors and readers in direct relation to machine-generated text, this piece has helped ground debates on electronic literature. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 17 times between Oct 29, 2008 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   hypertext collaboration interactive generative text html/dhtml

Title: Digital Nature: The Case Collection

URL: http://turbulence.org/Works/nature/index.html

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: Once the reader enters the Case Collection he learns that "a flood threatened to destroy everything." Two diaries, an illustrated children's book, a journalist's sound recording and other artifacts from a naturalist's secret collection could be saved. The reader is welcome to explore the narrative space of the project that provides a database of the 'saved' narrative objects such as films, photographs, letters, maps and diaries that accompany over 600 writings visually. These digital narrative objects can be browsed, they are from a fictional 1910 natural history expedition and relate to the life and trial of Sir Francis Case. The diaries, for instance, serve as minute details of an expedition to "a lodge on a hill" and the reader learns: "I have a conversation with the missionary, Amelie. She tells me that we are the Company's guest and best stay on good terms with their officials. I have developed a different view of matters during the course of my travels, but I dare not to tell her." With its graphical representations as well as the textual and literary browsing structure the Digital Case Collection bears a 'playable media' character using game elements to achieve interaction. It allows the reader to have exploratory trips one can return to and follow up on. Gaming conventions are used against the grain to mediate on the nature of digital artifacts and their relationship to time and space. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 19 times between May 02, 2008 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   metatextual playable media graphics historical

Title: Cruising

URL: http://www.poemsthatgo.com/gallery/spring2001/crusing-launch.html

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: "We wanted love" recites a voice that narrates a teenager's favorite pastime in Wisconsin, racing up and down the Main Street drag looking to make connections, wanting love. "Cruising" is a flash based poem with cinematic elements marked by a flow of images accompained by the poem text. The filmic flow suggests sights glimpsed from a train's window. A hidden code integrated into the piece lets the user control the speed, the direction, and the scale with the cursor, turning the reader into just another cruiser. The viewer moves between reading text and experiencing the flow of images but cannot exactly have both at the same time. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

Captured 19 times between May 02, 2008 and Aug 22, 2012

Subject:   flash women authors collaboration audio visual poetry or narrative poetry place cinematic

Title: JB Wock

URL: http://www.motorhueso.net/jbwock/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: JB Wock is a self-described “english-speaking blogmachine” created by poet and programmer Eugenio Tisselli. JB Wock, a PHP script, searches the web for a phrase that it “likes” (from a site that publishes notable quotations), “twists” these phrases by substituting synonyms, and publishes the results daily on its blog (which also includes a comment feature, inviting readers to respond). Tisselli includes links to the coding of the PHP script as well as a “Computer Aided Poetry” tool which allows users to alter their own phrases using the JB Wock script. The underlying script itself is an elegant feat in constraint, while the verses that it publishes daily often have an ephemeral and absurd quality, consistent with spirit of the Oulipo movement, but also gesturing towards contemporary debates over the physiological processes of human cognition and the indeterminate character of human expression. Entry drafted by: Davin Heckman

Captured  on Mar 05, 2010

Subject:   poetry procedural constraint-based e-poetry oulipo php script

Title: windsound

URL: http://collection.eliterature.org/1/works/cayley__windsound.html

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: John Cayley’s “windsound” is an algorithmic work presented as a 23-minute recording of a machine-generated reading of scrambled texts. The cinematic work presents a quicktime-video of white letters on a black screen, a text written by Cayley with a translation of the chinese poem “Cadence: Like a Dream” by Qin Guan (1049-1100). As a sensory letter-by-letter performance, the work sequentially replaces letters on the screen, so that what starts as illegible text becomes readable as a narrative, and then again loses meaning in a jumble of letters. Cayley calls this technique “transliteral morphing: textual morphing based on letter replacements through a sequence of nodal texts.” Sequences of text appear within up to 15 lines on the same screen, thus presenting and automatically replacing a longer text on a digitally simulated single page-a concept Judd Morrissey also applied in "The Jew´s Daughter". Unlike Morrissey’s piece, Cayley’s doesn´t allow the user to interact with the work that appears as a text-movie with ambient sound, murmurs of voices, windsound and synthetic female and male voices reading the non-readable to the viewer. With the letters, narrative perspectives also morph and switch fluidly between the lyrical-I, Christopher, Tanaka or Xiao Zhang, who appear in the story. Thus, the sentence: "‘We know,’" Tanaka had said in English/"‘Tomorrow if we meet/I will have to kill you myself/’" is, in the algorithmic process of the work, later spelled out by the I-narrator. As stated at the very end of the work, John Cayley created “windsound” in memory to Christopher Bledowski. What remains after a blackened screen and a start-over of morphing letters before they vanish conclusively, is windsound. At a certain point in the movie the text says "you have to be/to stay/silent/to hear it" and it seems like the reader has to be silent, too, listening to what he cannot understand, patiently waiting for the moment of legibility. Entry drafted by: Patricia Tomaszek

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Subject:   poetry appropriated texts ambient non-interactive synthetic voices algorithmic soundscape transliteral morphing

Title: Lexia to Perplexia

URL: http://collection.eliterature.org/1/works/memmott__lexia_to_perplexia.html

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

Description: As the author writes in an introduction to the piece, "Lexia to Perplexia" (2001) began as an observation of the fluctuating and ever-evolving protocols and prefixes of internet technology as applied to literary hypermedia. As well, "Lexia to Perplexia" was originally meant as a critique of both the Author and User/Reader positions in relation to web-based literary content." That is, the reader will notice that in all four sections of the work – "The Process of Attachment," "Double-Funnels," "Metastrophe," and "Exe.termination" -- "Lexia to Perplexia" makes wide use of neologisms as a means of presenting, in Katherine Hayles´ words, "a set of interrelated speculations about the future (and past) of human-intelligent machine interactions, along with extensive resinscriptions of human subjectivity and the human body" (Writing Machines 49). However, the text is performed not only linguistically, but also narratively and visually. Narratively, Memmott alludes to classical literary references ranging from ancient Greek and Egyptian myth to postmodern literary theory reflecting on humans, technologies, and their collaborative agency. Visually, the work makes use of interactive features which override the source text, leading to a fragmentary reading experience. The functioning and malfunctioning of the interface itself carries as much meaning as the words and images that compose the text. As Memmott also instructs his readers to note, the "User/Reader of this piece…encounters a number of screens that appear simple upon access. As the User/Reader interacts with the presented objects -- images, textual fragments, various UI permutations -- the screens are made more." Entry drafted by: Lori Emerson

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Subject:   Animation/Kinetic textual instrument

URL: http://luciditygame.com

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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URL: http://warnell.com/index.htm

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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URL: http://vispo.com/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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Videos: 56 Videos Captured

URL: http://katearmstrong.com/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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Videos: 6 Videos Captured

URL: http://www.waxweb.org/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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URL: http://luckysoap.com/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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Videos: 109 Videos Captured

URL: http://peterhoward.org/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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Videos: 14 Videos Captured

URL: http://www.bareword.com/sdt/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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URL: http://glia.ca/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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Videos: 185 Videos Captured

URL: http://vispo.com/keenan/4/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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Videos: 2 Videos Captured

URL: http://www.gender-f.com/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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Videos: 2 Videos Captured

URL: http://www.deenalarsen.net/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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URL: http://www.erikloyer.com/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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URL: http://www.talanmemmott.com/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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Videos: 2 Videos Captured

URL: http://nickm.com/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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Videos: 11 Videos Captured

URL: http://retts.net/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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Videos: 14 Videos Captured

URL: http://www.mandelbrot.fr/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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URL: http://reiner-strasser.de/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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URL: http://www.motorhueso.net/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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URL: http://www.vispo.com/uribe/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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URL: http://www.crissxross.net/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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Videos: 7 Videos Captured

URL: http://robwit.net/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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Title: 1001 nights cast

URL: http://1001.net.au/

Collection: Electronic Literature: Individual Works

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Videos: 35 Videos Captured

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